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What Being a Mayor Taught Pete Buttigieg

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“It has been a hard thing for Pete and for his administration to not be a top-down policymaker, but to find ways of gaining authentic input from large varieties of people,” said Ms. Schuth, director of Near Northwest Neighborhood Inc., which helps low-income residents buy homes. “And I absolutely think he’s gotten better at that.”

To Oliver Davis, a former South Bend city council member who often tangled with Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor is simply too green. “He’s ready on Day 2” of a crisis, is how Mr. Davis, who supports Mr. Biden, put it.

Jake Teshka, the only Republican on the South Bend city council, said that Mr. Buttigieg won his support for one initiative to address lead poisoning — requiring city inspections of rental units — over Mr. Teshka’s initial objection. “He brought in the Real Estate Investors Association, he brought tenants’ rights groups — folks from the far right, far left, he brought them to the table,” Mr. Teshka said. “We got down and dirty with it and the mayor was supportive through the whole thing.”

Mr. Teshka said Mr. Buttigieg had more relevant governing experience than either of the past two presidents, having managed more than 1,000 city employees and reached out to opponents to get things done. “Objectively speaking and removing partisanship, I’d say, look, it’s more scalable than being a reality TV star,” he said.

One morning in 2013, in his first term, Mr. Buttigieg arrived at work in the County-City Building, his body braced against the whoosh of five lanes of one-way traffic. “It’s always bothered me we have this racetrack downtown,” he told his senior staff.

Streets in the central city were designed to speed drivers to homes and shopping in the suburbs. Mr. Buttigieg believed a revival of South Bend, which Newsweek had named a “dying city,” should start with the urban core.

His Smart Streets initiative proposed converting central thoroughfares to allow two-way traffic, and adding bicycle lanes, trees and on-street parking, all to slow vehicles and encourage pedestrians.



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Politics

Andrew Yang joins CNN as a political commentator

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“I’m excited to join @CNN to help shed light on the election and the candidates’ experiences,” Yang wrote in a tweet following the announcement. “Learned a lot these past months and am glad to contribute to the public discussion.”
He’ll appear on the network in his new capacity later Wednesday, he added.
Yang, a businessman who ended his campaign last week, rose from obscurity to become a highly-visible candidate, rallying a coalition of liberal Democrats, libertarians and some disaffected Republicans to form a devoted group of followers known as the Yang Gang.

A prominent platform in his campaign was his so-called Freedom Dividend, a plan to give every American adult $1,000 a month universal basic income that he argued would alleviate a host of social ills and eradicate poverty.

Yang’s campaign was defined by the candidate’s happy go-lucky style. Videos of him singing in a church choir, dancing to the “Cupid Shuffle” and crowdsurfing at events regularly went viral, helping burnish his image as a candidate just happy to be with his fans.

He also often used high-profile moments to compliment his opponents. After former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke dropped out and before a Democratic debate where they would have been standing next to each other, Yang simply tweeted, “I miss Beto.” After New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker failed to qualify for a debate stage, Yang used yet another debate stage moment to tell voters, “Cory will be back,” a move that was appreciated by Booker and his top campaign aides.

This story has been updated to include reaction from Yang.





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Centerville included in CBS News’ segment politics, economy

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In the small town of West Union, Ohio, on the edge of Appalachia, Mike’s Family Restaurant serves up breakfast to a staple of loyal customers.

CBS News’ Adriana Diaz spent a couple of days last week in Ohio traveling to three different communities to three different restaurants talking to local folks about life.

The day started with manners and a morning prayer, but the conversation quickly turned to politics.

Kenny Moles, who is a retired business owner, said, “I’m thinking the Democrats don’t have a chance.” “Why is that?” Diaz asked.

Moles said, “They don’t have – well, they’re going in the wrong direction, for one thing. We’re capitalists and they’re socialists. And this is not a socialist country.” 

Moles has been voting Republican since Richard Nixon was in office.

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Across the room, cousins Dennis and Terry Grooms were lifelong Democrats until 2016. “The more we followed him, the more we liked what we heard. He has delivered on his promises, referring to President Trump.”

They said the president has boosted morale for the American worker, which is a big selling point here in one of Ohio’s poorest counties, where both unemployment and opioid addiction are high.
Terry Grooms said, “First, they’d give me Vicodin, then they moved it to Percocet then they moved it to OxyContin. Next thing you know I was a drug addict.” Terry said he has been clean for over six years. But he said his life is better now under the Trump Administration.

“Before Trump, you know, I’m not ashamed of it. I had to get food stamps and stuff, And after, you know, I got a job,” Terry Grooms said.Diaz asked, “Do you credit the president for the fact that you were able to find work?” Terry Grooms said, “yeah, he kind of motivated me”

So, Diaz and her crew left West Union and headed toward the suburbs of Dayton, Ohio. The suburb that was chosen was Centerville, Ohio, fitting because it’s actual county is politically in the center.

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In 2008 and 2012, voters in Montgomery County leaned ever so slightly for Obama, but in 2016, President Trump won by 7 percent.
At Famous Restaurant, boy was it split down the middle. Small business owner Debbie Miller credits President Trump for a strong economy. “You’ve got to admit, the jobs have come back,” she said.

However, Miller’s niece Samantha Dains, who also voted for President Trump, no longer thinks he’s fit to be president. “It doesn’t even matter about the economy, I feel like he’s going to put us in a world war,” Dains said.

Entrepreneur Dave Paprocki agrees the economy shouldn’t be the only metric of success. He’s still undecided.

“There’s still other issues that need to be solved. And, the important thing is that we have someone who is reaching across the aisle and thinking about, like, how we are actually going to get there,” Paprocki said,
From Centerville, Diaz and her crew head to Columbus. Folks in this county have voted for the Democratic presidential nominee.

Columbus is the state’s capital and most populous city. It’s actually known as America’s test city because a lot of companies choose Columbus to test out their products because of the city’s demographic makeup.

CBS’ Diaz caught up with the happy hour crowd at Bakersfield Short North.

Medic Isaiah Taylor said, “Me, personally, I haven’t seen nothing.” He said he hasn’t felt the strong economy personally.
“And, all I’ve seen is just, you know, bills get higher, taxes get raised a little bit more and that’s more money out of my pocket,” Taylor said.
Renee Holton, who’s still paying off her bachelor’s and master’s degrees wants a candidate with a plant to tackle student debt.

“I have debt that I don’t, I mean, I make my payments, but it’s just the interest rates are so high on it,” Holton said. 
There were several co-workers talking about health care bills before Diaz and her crew even approached them. 
Jackie Lloyd said, “It was just very eye-opening for me to see what a minor medical event can cost you if you don’t have insurance, let alone, I mean, I spent several thousand dollars out of pocket with great health insurance. So, it was kind of a scary wake-up call.”



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How Ford bungled the 2019 launch of its bestselling Explorer

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Ford has had its share of struggles lately, including last year’s launch of its bestselling 2020 Explorer, a popular sport utility vehicle thought to be a bit of a cash cow for the automaker.

Ford said in February that its president of automotive, Joe Hinrichs, would retire. Hinrichs oversaw operations for the automaker. Some automotive industry analysts viewed the move as fallout from the Explorer launch. Sales of the vehicle had fallen year over year in both the third and fourth quarters of 2019.

There have been at least four recalls of the Explorer since Ford began delivering the vehicle in the middle of 2019 and another three recalls for the Lincoln Aviator, a higher-end vehicle built on the same platform. Ford told CNBC that most of those recalls were handled before vehicles left sales lots.

Reports have surfaced of customers saddled with troubles in newly purchased Explorers and Aviators. The Detroit Free Press reported that unnamed sources inside the company worried that the company has not taken steps to fix “chronic manufacturing issues” and worry Ford “lost track of quality control.”

Ford acknowledged difficulties with the launch on conference calls with investors in 2019, but the automaker said the launch was an unusual situation.

The launch of the Escape compact SUV went far better, the company said, and it expects the roll-out of its Mustang Mach-E electric SUV to go smoothly as well. The company plans to launch some key products over the next several quarters, including a new version of its F-Series full-size pickup, which is widely considered Ford’s primary profit machine.



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