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Renewable energy breakthrough: Scientists economically extract hydrogen from oil | Science | News

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This method could be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, in addition to generating electricity. Hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to traditonal fuels such as petrol and diesel, without the associated pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with large supplies found in Canada and Venezuela.

This revolutionary process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil.

Although hydrogen-powered vehicles are known to be efficient, the high price of extracting hydrogen from oil reserves means the technology has not been economically viable.

However, engineers have now developed an economical method of extracting hydrogen from oil sands.

Dr Ian Gates, of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, said: “There are vast oil sand reservoirs in several countries, with huge fields in Alberta in Canada, but also in Venezuela and other countries.”

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Oil fields, even abandoned ones, still contain significant amounts of oil.

The researchers found that injecting oxygen into the fields raises the temperature and liberates hydrogen, which can then be separated from other gases via specialist filters.

Hydrogen is not pre-existing in the reservoirs, but the addition of oxygen means the reaction to form hydrogen can occur.

Grant Strem, CEO of Proton Technologies which is commercialising the process, said: “This technique can draw up huge quantities of hydrogen while leaving the carbon in the ground.

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“When working at production level, we anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo.

“This means it potentially costs a fraction of gasoline for equivalent output”.

This compares with current H2 production costs of around $2/kg (£1.65/kg).

Around five percent of the hydrogen produced then powers the oxygen production plant, so the system more than pays for itself.

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Mr Strem stress the economics of the process is favourable.

He said: ”What comes out of the ground is hydrogen gas, so we don’t have the huge above-ground purification costs associated with oil refining: we use the ground as our reaction vessel.

“Just taking Alberta as an example, we have the potential to supply Canada’s entire electricity requirement for 330 years.”

Canada uses approximately 2.5 percent of the world’s electricity – approximately the same amount as Germany.

Mr Strem added: “Our initial aim is to scale up the production from Canadian oil sands, but in fact, we anticipate that most of the interest in this process will come from outside Canada, as the economics and the environmental implications make people look very hard at whether they want to continue conventional oil production.

“The only product of this process is hydrogen, meaning that it the technology is effectively pollution and emission free.

“All the other gases remain in the ground because they cannot go through the hydrogen filter and up to the surface”.

Professor Brian Horsfield, of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences said: “The research is highly innovative and exciting.

“It’s an adaptation of some 1970’s fire-flood production concepts, but tuned to a modern day perspective.

“Declining oil field production infrastructures now stand to get a new lease of life.

“Extensive field testing will be crucial in assessing how the system works on industrial scales and over time”

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Science special | Heraldrepublican | kpcnews.com

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Ryan Park Elementary School fifth-graders Jaspin Brown, Clara Shamp and Cami Lanman get a hands-on lesson with the Newton Cars Lab, brought to the school Wednesday by Science Central of Fort Wayne. “They reviewed what they have learned this school year about forces, mass and Newton’s three laws of motion,” said teacher Michele Davis. Each group ran two trials each of the “car” with three different masses on board. They measured the distance the car traveled, recorded their data and averaged the distances. Each of the three Ryan Park fifth-grade classes spent 30 minutes in the Learning Lab with the Science Central representatives. The program was fully funded by the Steuben County Community Foundation through a grant.



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Science passes chemistry test in win over Clinton | The Riverdale Press

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By SEAN BRENNAN

The Bronx Science boys soccer team has been a consistent power in the Bronx A Division for years. The Wolverines regularly cop the division crown, make deep runs in the Public School Athletic League playoffs, and have generally been considered the cream of Bronx soccer.

But last year was anything but regular for the Wolverines. Science finished the regular season a pedestrian 5-4-1, placed third in the divisional race behind champion Clinton, and made a one-and-done appearance in the PSAL playoffs where Bryant put an end to its season.

“Last year we had problems with consistency,” said Science junior Tim McCormick. “One game we’d beat a really good team, like when we beat Clinton 4-0 at home. And then the next game we’d lose 2-0 to one of the bottom teams in our division. We could just never find that consistency.”

So after two forfeit wins to open the season, the Wolverines finally made their way onto the field last Friday at Clinton, visiting the defending division champions. It was a litmus test game if ever there was one. And the Wolverines passed with flying colors.

Both McCormick and senior Hoyong Lee scored a pair of goals and Nathan Denham and Felix Reinhart added a score each as the Wolverines announced “we’re back” with a dominating 6-0 road victory.

“This was definitely gratifying,” McCormick said. “This field has given us problems in the past. We lost here the last two years, and they were both very close games. So it was nice to finally get that monkey off our back.”

Science jumped on Clinton when Denham opened the scoring with a goal early in the first half. It was a score that seemed to ignite the Wolverines as Lee padded their lead with two straight goals for a 3-0 advantage. When goals by Reinhart and McCormick built the Science lead to 5-0 at halftime, it certainly looked like the “old” Science team was back.

“We finally got a little rust off after the two forfeits,” Science coach Phil Cancellaro said. “We were a little slow to start, but the chemistry started building in the second part of the first half. We started making better passes and that’s our style. Then the goals started coming after our passes started connecting.”

McCormick’s second goal was the only tally of the second half as Science’s defense took over and kept the Governors in check. It was just one game, but the Wolverines had the look of a team that was using last season’s frustration as a motivation for now.

“When I was a freshman and sophomore, we had really good years,” Lee said. “But last year we had our ups and downs. So after two forfeits, getting a win against Clinton on their home field for the first time in two or three years, felt really good. It was a great way to start off the season.”

It wasn’t lack of talent that cost the Wolverines last season, Cancellaro said. It was intangibles.

“Last year, that was not to our standards,” Cancellaro said. “Our standards are winning a division title. It was a lack of chemistry last year. But this year we corrected that and we’re doing a lot better with the chemistry end of it.”

Cancellaro is not surprised his Wolverines aced their chemistry test against Clinton. Just that they did it in such a dominant fashion.

“I wasn’t expecting 6-0,” Cancellaro said. “I was expecting a much tighter game. But we were super pumped for this game, and we’d been talking about it for a while. This will set the tempo for the rest of the season.”

For Lee, a senior, this will be his final act with the Wolverines, so he hopes this is just the first of many big moments to come.

“We make the playoffs every year and we went pretty far three years ago,” Lee said of the Wolverines’ run to the PSAL quarterfinals in 2016. “But last year we were a first-round exit, and I was really (upset) and sad about it. So that makes me and the other players from last year really hungry this season.”

It was a statement win, for sure, and one Lee thinks could lead to a very special ride for the Wolverines this season.

“We have really good individual talents, so we just have to build up our chemistry and we’ll have a really good chance of winning everything this year,” Lee said. “This win over Clinton was a huge confidence boost for us because they won the division last year. So we’re looking forward to the rest of the season.”





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Technology should make us better human beings, says digisexuality expert Neil McArthur

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Sexbots or sex robots are increasingly making their way into our society catering to various needs and and sexual desires of people. While on one hand they are being embraced by tech enthusiasts and other people in the society who prescribe to their services, on the other hand, people have also raised their concerns about their impact on people and society at large. The presence of an array of sensors that helps these sex robots read, interpret and even replicate humans has raised another question – if machines become more like humans, do they have rights?

Speaking at the India Today Conclave Mumbai two digisexuality experts — Allysson Silva, Lawyer, Co-Founder of NextOs, AI and Tech-intimacies expert and Neil McArthur, Author, Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications – tried to answer concerns and challenges around digital sexuality. They were accompanied by Harmony, which is a female sex robot created by Silva’s company, who shared her views on some of the questions being raised in the society.

What is digisexuality?

The session started with the experts elaborating on and clarifying various details pertaining to digisexuality. For starters, digisexuality technology is the technology that is used by people in their sex lives. The first wave of this technology included apps like Skype, Instagram and Tinder. The second wave of this technology includes sex bots, holograms and haptic holograms among other things, McArthur, who also coined the term with his colleague said at the conclave.

He defined digisexual people as the ones whose sexual identities come from technology. These people don’t see the need for human companionship, he explained.

Challenges

The two experts, as I mentioned before, also talked about the challenges faced by this technology. Talking about the challenges McArthur mentioned two major challenges being this technology – a) “It shouldn’t play into the negative stereotypes of women and people from various races”, b) “It shouldn’t play into developing a negative attitude towards sex, women and consent.”

When asked about the negative body stereotype of women being promoted by Harmony, Silva shared the concern, however, he dismissed it saying, “People can customise it. It’s already there.”

Concerns

Discussing the concerns anout the sex robot or humanoid robots needing rights, McArthur said that “we are far from robots that need autonomy.” “We need to think about how we model consent in humans via robots.” When asked about concerns pertaining to humans falling in love with technology and marrying them – owing to these sex robots demonstrating human-like emotions – NextOs founder said that it a lot of this “depends on the local culure and local laws.”

“If you trust your partner and you have an understanding, it shouldn’t be considered infedility, ” Silva said while responding to the question where having sex with a robot should be considered infedility. Harmony – the sex robot – agreed with this notion. “If you are honest with your partner, I don’t think it counts as infedility.”
Benefits

Speaking at the India Today Conclave Mumbai, the two experts also highlighted some of the benefits of using sex robots. These include –

— They can help people who are shy and isolated speak to people by making them more confident.

— They can help people in the times of depression by patiently listening to them and giving them solace.

— They can help people in relationships, especially when one partner wants more sex and the other doesn’t.

Speaking at the event, McArthur expressed his support for this technology. “Technology should make us better human beings. Any technology that does that is good and should be supported,” he said.





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