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Pete Buttigieg’s question to woman who shook RFK’s hand takes awkward turn

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Presidential candidate and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg had an awkward campaign trail encounter Tuesday with a woman in Iowa who told him she once met the late-Robert F. Kennedy.

The Democrat was campaigning at the Iowa State Fair when a woman approached him and said she met Kennedy in 1968, according to a tweet from a CNN producer.

“I shook Robert Kennedy’s hand in 1968,” the woman told him.

SOUTH BEND COPS WARN CITY BECOMING ‘WILD WEST’ AMID SPATE OF SHOOTINGS, RIFT WITH BUTTIGIEG

Buttigieg responded: “So you’re good luck?”

“Not really— he was shot a month later,” the woman said.

Kennedy, the former senator and attorney general beloved by liberals, was assassinated in California in 1968 while seeking the Democratic nomination for president. His brother, President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated in 1963.

Buttigieg is among the Democratics who have been campaigning over the last few days at the Iowa State Fair.

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“I’m running for president because it’s time to have somebody in the Oval Office who will stick up for American values,” Buttigieg said during a speech at the fair Tuesday.

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Trump Official Wanted Taxpayers to Reimburse For Stolen Property

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President Donald Trump’s Medicare chief, Seema Verma, filed a $47,000 claim for lost property in an effort to have taxpayers reimburse her for items that were stolen this summer while she was on a work trip. The property that went missing along with Verma’s bags, according to Politico, included an Ivanka Trump-brand pendant that Verma’s jeweler valued at $5,900.

Verma claimed $43,065 in missing jewelry, two dozen pieces in total, and clothing. The jewelry was appraised three weeks after the theft in San Francisco where she was giving a speech.

A Department of Health and Human Services spokesperson told Politico that receiving a reimbursement, at a discounted rate, for stolen personal property while on work related trips has been a longstanding policy. The agency ultimately reimbursed her $2,852.40.

“When paying for such goods, the department pays a discounted rate based on age for the items that were lost. It’s perfectly appropriate that the administrator filed a personal property loss claim for goods stolen while on work travel and this is not an unusual practice for federal employees,” the spokesperson said.

According to the police report, back in July, when the theft took place, Verma initially estimated the cost of her lost property at $20,000.





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Supreme Court to decide if state can consider political affiliation in judicial appointments – JURIST – News

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The US Supreme Court issued an order on Friday granting certiorari to a new case for their current term. Carney v. Adams challenges the constitutionality of a Delaware law limiting the appointment of judges based on their political affiliation in order to achieve balance on the court.

Within Delaware’s Constitution, the Article IV, Section 3 provision prohibits judges affiliated with any one political party to constitute more than a “bare majority” on all of the state’s courts. For the higher courts, seats are balanced based on “major political party.” The law attempts to establish a balance between political ideologies on each court but is accused of omitting smaller political parties. As a result, the provision in its entirety has been challenged as a violation of a person’s First Amendment right to freedom of association.

The plaintiff in this case, James Adams, is a retired lawyer seeking a judicial position. Adams is a registered Independent. When attempting to apply for a judicial position in 2014, Adams found he was unable to apply as both the Superior and Supreme Courts were comprised of a bare majority of Democrats; making the only positions available open to Republicans. He attempted to reapply in 2017, but again the positions were only open to Republicans.

In his original lawsuit, the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware determined that while Adams only had standing to challenge some of the provision’s sections, a ruling on the merits rendered the entire provision unconstitutional. On appeal, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit upheld the first three sections of the provision to be unconstitutional — the sections with language demanding a “major political party” — but reversed the District Court’s decision regarding the others due to Adams lack of standing.

The Supreme Court has asked each party to address both the First Amendment issue as well as the standing question.



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One of the last survivors of the USS Arizona was interred on the sunken warship

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Lauren Bruner, one of 334 crew members to survive the December 7, 1941 attack, died on September 10, just months before his 99th birthday.
Loved ones gathered at sunset at the USS Arizona Memorial in Honolulu, Hawaii. Family and friends handed Bruner’s ashes over to divers who placed the urn inside the well of the barbette on gun turret No. 4. A barbette is an armored structure protecting a gun turret on a warship.

The ceremony included a rifle salute, flag presentation and plaque presentation in honor of the veteran. A barbette is an armored structure protecting a gun turret on a warship.

The memorial can only be reached by boat as was built above the submerged hull of the sunken battleship. The hull is a tomb for more than 900 sailors who remain within and serves as an artificial reef providing habitat for marine life.

Only the remains of USS Arizona survivors can be interred on the sunken battleship. Pearl Harbor survivors can have their ashes scattered over the harbor.

Bruner was on the sky control deck when the ship was struck by several bombs, igniting explosions which killed 1,177 Arizona crew members. He was one of a handful of sailors on deck to survive the catastrophic explosion when a bomb struck the Arizona’s forward magazine.
After the explosion, he swam across 70 feet of burning water to reach the repair ship USS Vestal. Bruner suffered burns on nearly 80 percent of his body and was wounded by Japanese gunfire.

He recovered from his wounds and returned to sea, serving aboard the destroyer USS Coghlan in eight more battles against the Japanese, according to the Navy. He finished the war as a fire control chief on Coghlan, steaming into Nagasaki harbor only days after the atomic bomb explosion.

Bruner is the 44th and last USS Arizona survivor to be interred, according to Emily Pruett, a spokeswoman for the Pearl Harbor National Memorial.

“The wrecks of only two vessels remain in the harbor — the Arizona and USS Utah — so survivors of those ships are the only ones who have the option to be laid to rest this way,” Pruett told CNN.

The rest of the ships which were struck that day were either repaired or scrapped, she said.

The last three living survivors of the USS Arizona plan to be laid to rest with their families.



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