Connect with us

affilate software business

Tech

New technology makes centralized power plants outmoded – The Mercury News

Published

on


New systems better than
centralized power plants

Re: “Manjoo: It’s the end of California as we know it” (Opinion section, Mercurynews.com, Oct. 31):

Farhad Manjoo’s oped suggests, among other suggestions, that California design the power grid to serve more people more effectively.

Inventors Edison, Westinghouse and Tesla established the first electricity systems to be centralized with power plants connected to users by long transmission lines.

For the most part, centralized power generation is still in place today. Yet, new power generation technologies and storage systems make centralized power out-moded. We now have the means to provide our electricity more locally.

Local power makes local control more feasible. If needed to avoid wildfires, you would be able to shut off power in Geyserville without interrupting power to many other communities. Existing long transmission lines would only be needed as backup to local power.



Source

Continue Reading
Partners
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tech

Hyderabad: Aggregator to pay 50,000 to customer who missed train as driver took longer route | Hyderabad News

Published

on

By


HYDERABAD: A district consumer forum has directed aggregator Dot Cabs to pay little over 51,000 to a consumer who had to miss his train as the cab driver took a ‘longer route’ to reach the Secunderabad railway station.
The complainant, KVV Prasad Rao, submitted that he and his family members booked a cab from Dot Cabs Pvt Ltd on September 19, 2016, to travel from Kukatpally Housing Board to Secunderabad railway station to catch a train to Kakinada. He submitted that they boarded cab at around 6 pm to catch Kakinada Express, which was bound to depart at 8:45 pm. He alleged that though he requested the driver to take them via Kukatpally, Balanagar, he took them via Hitech City, Jubilee Hills, and Punjagutta.
Rao claimed that the cab driver reached Begumpet railway station at 8:20 pm and advised them to board MMTS at the station to reach the Secunderabad railway station platform directly. After informing the customer service of the cab aggregator, they boarded MMTS, but only reached the station by 9 pm.
Alleging that they had failed to catch the train due to Dot Cab’s negligence and had to incur additional expenditure by boarding a flight to Rajahmundry to reach their native place, he filed this complaint.
The representatives of Dot cabs, in their written version, contended that there is no negligence on their part as the driver reached their location by 5.30 pm, but the complainant and his family boarded it only at 6 pm. They claimed that the driver opted for the fastest route and alleged that they got down at Begumpet station despite having sufficient time (35 minutes) in hand to reach their destination by cab. They added that they are not liable for any loss/damage as their terms and conditions.
During the trial, the bench noticed that the driver had chosen a longer route to reach the Secunderabad railway station and gave wrong advice to catch a local train at Begumpet station to reach Secunderabad. “The conduct of the cab driver of the opposite party in choosing a long route and giving wrong advice amounts to deficiency of service. The opposite party is bound by the action of the cab driver who is none other than its employee,” said the bench.





Source

Continue Reading

Tech

People getting rid of Fitbits after Google

Published

on

By


Fitbit Insire HR

Todd Haselton | CNBC

When Mike Carpenter learned Google’s latest acquisition would be Fitbit, the maker of a device he wore at all hours of the day except in the shower, he left his Fitbit Charge 3 on the table at his office where he was working that day. He, and others like him, haven’t picked theirs up since.

On Nov. 1, Google said would be buying Fitbit for $2.1 billion in hopes of boosting its hardware business getting a foothold in the health space. Google explicitlysaid in the deal announcement that it won’t sell their personal or health data. Despite that assurance, some Fitbit users say they don’t trust the company, and are shedding the product altogether.

“I’m not only afraid of what they can do with the data currently, but what they can do with it once their AI advances in 10 or 20 years,” Carpenter told CNBC, saying he didn’t believe the company’s privacy assurances. “Health insurance companies would love to get their hands on that data and their purposes wouldn’t be advertising so is that what they are going to do with it? They didn’t spend the money to not utilize it in some way.”

The trend of people throwing or threatening to throw out their Fitbit devices comes as Google faces a perception problem that has spanned everyday users and regulators alike. The company has paid data privacy fines in the EU and made recent strides into the stringently regulated healthcare industry, which has caused the public to re-think seemingly harmless tools. Privacy groups this week began pushing regulators to block the Fitbit acquisition, which the company originally hoped to close in early 2020.

Google didn’t respond to requests for comment.

“I only recently got it and now I’m thinking I don’t need Google watching literally my every step or my every heart beat,” said Dan Kleinman, who said he is getting rid of his Fitbit Versa.

Some people cited Google’s 2014 acquisition of Nest Labs, which, at the time consisted of smart home thermostats. Since then, the company has tied Nest’s technology, branding and device accounts to its digital assistant and smart speakers.

“I use a lot of Google services and think they do a decent job, but I’m not interested in adding my health data to their systems,” said Fredrik Matheson who got rid of his Charge 3 after the announcement. “The moment my wife — who is not in tech — heard Google had agreed to acquire Fitbit, she asked me to figure out which watch she should replace her Fitbit with.”

Twitter users have been tweeting about their plans to get rid of their devices upon hearing of the acquisition.

“With news of the acquisition of your company, I intend to sell my Fitbit & delete my account,” said a tweet from Tanya Janca, which received several hundred retweets and likes. “I like your product and have enjoyed it many years, but I value my privacy much, much more. The aggregation of data possible makes me extremely uncomfortable.”

Some critical users say they’re now considering Fitbit’s main rival, the Apple Watch, while others longed for the early days of low-tech fitness tracking.

“This may push me to pay for an Apple Watch, and jettison my current Fitbit (assuming I even still want a thing strapped to my wrist collecting data about me),” tweeted author Stephen Anderson. “Can we just bring back Pebble?”

Carpenter and Kleinman later pointed to the news about Google’s partnership with health giant Ascension, saying they were glad they made the decision to leave their Fitbit devices behind. “Google could know which medications I take, and what any medical diagnosis’s I have,” Carpenter said. “It makes me feel sick to my stomach.”

WATCH NOW: Why Google keeps selling hardware



Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Icebreaker’s science tender sea trials underway — Australian Antarctic Division

Published

on

By


The Nuyina’s science tender undergoing sea trials in Norway.

Final sea trials for the science tender of Australia’s new icebreaker, RSV Nuyina, are underway in Norway this week.

Australian Antarctic Division Icebreaker Project Manager, Nick Browne, said the 10.3 metre-long vessel was uniquely designed to support scientific research in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica.

“The science tender will enable scientists to undertake marine and geoscience work in open water and ice, independently or in parallel with the Nuyina’s scientific systems,” he said.

“The vessel is fitted with state-of-the-art equipment, including a multibeam bathymetric echo sounder to map the sea floor, a sound velocity profiler for oceanographic work, and moon pool for the deployment of instruments through the hull.

“It also has an A-frame on the stern to deploy towed scientific equipment and small trawls, and a side davit rated to deploy scientific instruments in rough seas.”

The science tender will be able to operate in temperatures as low as minus 30 degrees Celsius and is fitted with two five-cylinder diesel engines and Duoprop drives for exceptional handling and acceleration power. 

The vessel can accommodate four scientists and two crew and has a range of 150 nautical miles at 12 knots, with a maximum speed of 20 knots in sea state 3.

Testing is being conducted in the fiords around Alesund, Norway and will continue over the next three weeks. The test area provides sheltered water with a range of shallow and deep regions required to demonstrate the full capabilities of the acoustic instruments being tested.

The milestone represents another step forward in the commissioning of Australia’s new icebreaker. Last month, the landing barges, made by local Tasmanian business Taylor Bros, were successfully tested on the Derwent River in Hobart.

The Nuyina is also fitted with two further tenders that will be used to transfer personnel and supplies, supporting the important resupply activities of the new ship.

Sea trials for the RSV Nuyina will commence in February. The icebreaker is expected to arrive in Hobart next year, ahead of the 2020-21 Antarctic season.



Source

Continue Reading

Trending

We use cookies to best represent our site. By continuing to use this site, you agree to the use of cookies.
Yes