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Lizzo Wore a Gold Metallic Cutout Swimsuit in New Zealand

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We’ve seen plenty of bold, flashy swimsuits so far this season, from Kim Kardashian’s risky maillot to Bella Hadid’s burning-hot cutout one-piece, but no one owns the shine like Lizzo. “I love you. You are beautiful. You can do anything. (Repeat),” she wrote on Instagram underneath a series of shots of herself posing in this intricate Marysteph lamé design ($55) on the beach in New Zealand. Lizzo’s body positive caption was just the icing on the cake that was this photo shoot, which she hosted with friends and stylist Marko Monroe. It was a party, and Lizzo’s followers were all invited, as she continued to dance for the camera in a second post to show off her well-crafted beach ensemble from every angle.

Lizzo’s metallic swimsuit came equipped with a gold ring halter style top, invisible straps, and a center sash. She played up the shimmer even more with gold-rimmed circle sunglasses and a chain-link necklace. It takes a lot of confidence for anyone to flaunt her bikini body for over 7M social followers, but Lizzo doing so in a barely there suit like this alongside an empowering caption is the reason why we love her. You’re as beautiful as you feel, and clearly Lizzo feels best in lamé. Read ahead if you feel the same way about the material and want to add something to your swim drawer that evokes just as much glamour.





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Should we ration fashion? Lessons in sustainability from the second world war | Fashion

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A wartime-style economy is often cited as a potential path towards meeting our international carbon emissions agreements. In debates about the fashion industry, the idea of a shift as radical as the one that took place in the second world war is frequently mooted in conversations about sustainability.

Clearly this is a problematic comparison. It is important not to romanticise the violence of war or glamorise the reality of political states of emergency. But there is a reason the idea keeps being raised. The war is the most recent time in which the economy was overhauled in the face of an existential threat. It is the closest demonstration we have that quick, radical change is possible if we all come together.

Clothing was rationed then – a system that changed consumption habits and helped to keep precious materials for use in the war effort. This did not actually mean the end of variety, or creativity. There were varying qualities of clothing still available at different price points and design was cleverly rethought to minimise waste. Uniforms were made without covered button plackets; pleats were removed from pockets to save on cloth; double cuffs, trouser turn-ups and elastic waistbands were abolished. Utility became desirable, with garments produced by top designers and endorsed by celebrities, and clothes generally became more practical.

“Make do and mend” was a cultural effort by government to encourage people to fix clothing or modify it to make it feel new. Dressmaking and pattern-cutting lessons built up skills and many made their own clothes to save on coupons. Knitting took off as a practical pastime and jewellery was made out of reclaimed and unusual materials. Clothing exchanges took place via the Women’s Voluntary Service and an independent points system enabled swappers to claim the value back at another time. This was especially helpful for those with growing children to dress.

Rental, swapping, sewing clubs and upcycling are being widely explored at the moment, too. All could be seen as a revival of wartime principles and ideas. But the key difference is that in the second world war there was such a need to meticulously plan. The dominant mode of shopping was to seek out clothing based on needs, not wants, and on a sense of duty to the future.

Co-founder of the environmental action group Extinction Rebellion, Clare Farrell.



Co-founder of the environmental action group Extinction Rebellion, Clare Farrell. Photograph: Isabel Infantes/AFP via Getty Images

A return to rationing now would feel very alien in a neoliberal age, when our sense of freedom is so closely tied up with our freedom to shop. But it makes an interesting thought experiment. It opens up the idea of government intervention beyond the go-to suggestion of a levy on clothes, which has so far failed to pass through parliament. What if, for example, we could buy only a certain amount of new clothing – and then buy as much secondhand as we wanted? What if we got a tax break for ethical shopping – just as in Scandinavia the government gives a tax break to repair shops? What else can we think of?

As one of Extinction Rebellion’s founding members – and as someone who has worked for years in fashion – I was involved in the protests this London fashion week and last, arguing that it should be replaced with a platform talking about how to rapidly overhaul the industry’s practices. I still believe this should happen. Change is coming for the fashion industry whether we like it or not and, for me, it needs to come from within.

Radical ideas are needed, with a focus on justice for workers as our industry transitions. We have agreed to climate targets – but we have no roadmap to meet them. Despite lots of creative talent in the fashion industry, the biggest companies are failing to show urgency, bravery or leadership.

Now, as we accept that we are in a new, long-term, state of grief and emergency, we need to find cultural alignment around meaningful purpose. We need to find a new business model and we need to change together. The fashion industry is a powerful cultural force and with that comes great responsibility. It’s time to overcome elitism and division, and reimagine culture with empathy at its centre.

As told to Hannah Marriott



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Invicta Watch Group taps Shaquille O’Neal for multi-year deal and watch collection

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Invicta Watch Group’s Invicta brand has teamed up with Authentic Brands Group (ABG) for a multi-year partnership with famed retired basketball player and entrepreneur Shaquille O’Neal, complete with a new line of watches designed by the athlete.

Invicta

The line of watches, made exclusively for Invicta, will feature “unique designs combined with innovative creations from Invicta…that represent the quintessential essence of the Invicta brand,” the company said. 

Set to launch in spring 2020, the timepiece collection will be available at Invicta stores, via a variety of retailers worldwide, and on ShopHQ, the nationally distributed TV shopping network owned by iMedia Brands Inc., a partner of Invicta. 

“[O’Neal] has a broad reach to all of our customers as he brings his positive approach to life and a sense of style,” said Eyal Lalo, CEO of Invicta Watch Group. 

Previously, O’Neal has entered into product collaborations with golf clothing brand Psycho Bunny and Skechers — both children’s lines — and was the source of inspiration for Victoria Beckham’s 2018 collaborative collection with Reebok. 

Invicta, the flagship brand of the Invicta Watch Group, was founded in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland in 1837, and was re-established in 1994 by Eyal Lalo. According to the company, Invicta designs over 1,500 unique models per year and has received 55 design and mechanical patents and holds 1,250 trademarks. 

Invicta’s other timepiece partnerships have included collaborative collections with Marvel, DC, and the Star Wars franchise, among others. 

Copyright © 2020 FashionNetwork.com All rights reserved.



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Mel C reveals that ‘scuffle’ with Victoria Beckham almost got her kicked out of the Spice Girls

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Mel C is sharing about her struggles during her time with the Spice Girls and the clash with Victoria Beckham that almost led to her being kicked out of the famed British pop group.

Appearing on BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs program, the singer (real name: Melanie Chisholm) detailed her clash with Beckham and the subsequent breakdown of her well-being that exacerbated her eating disorder and depression.

“We’d all had a few bevvies and on the way out there was a little scuffle between myself and Victoria,” said Chisholm, 46, who was known as “Sporty Spice.” “I was told if that behavior ever happened again, then I would be out.”

Realizing that she nearly lost her place in the band before they rose to fame, Chisholm began to struggle more emotionally, and her eating disorder spun out of control.

“I think that is where the start of some of my problems came because I had to be very, very strict with myself. I couldn’t allow myself to relax because if I did I might mess it all up,” says Chisholm, who then went from “being anorexic to having a binge eating disorder. “No matter how much you eat, you can’t fill this hole. My appearance began to change, which was the biggest fear.”

Seeing herself often described as “the plain one at the back,” Chisholm tried to make herself perfect, exercising obsessively and spiraling into depression. Her physician later diagnosed her with depression, which Chisholm called a massive relief.

Mel C (pictured with her fellow Spice Girls in 1997) says she was bullied while in the group. (Photo: REUTERS/Kieran Doherty)

“I thought, ‘Oh my God, there’s a name for it and I can be helped,’” Chisholm said through tears.

Chisholm also detailed being bullied by one of her bandmates, explaining that she was too scared to complain because they were one of the biggest acts in the world at the time.

“When your absolute ultimate fairy tale actually happens to you, you feel guilty about complaining about anything,” says Chisholm. “We were the biggest band in the world, and I felt guilty about complaining.”

Now a mother to 11-year-old Scarlett, the singer said being a parent has “made me braver” and even motivated her to leave Scarlett’s dad, property developer Thomas Starr.

“I make big decisions. Leaving her dad was hard but I wasn’t happy and she wasn’t happy, and it wasn’t the environment I wanted my child to grow up in,” said Chisholm. “I couldn’t have done that without the strength that I got from her.”

In addition to creating a successful solo career and being a full-fledged triathlete, Chisholm recently returned to the stage with her former bandmates on the Spice World stadium tour.

“Even though we’ve had our differences, when we are on stage together on that stage, we are formidable, and we would kill for each other,” said Chisholm. “And that’s a really powerful thing to have.”

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