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HPD stats: Crimes generally up from fall '18 to '19

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ABC13’s Ted Oberg breaks down violent crime stats for Houston following a robbery spree that left three people stabbed.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. RussiaNukesAmerica3

    December 5, 2019 at 1:05 am

    I was about to disagree until I just walked out to my vehicle and saw a guy wearing a hoodie driving away in it

  2. DougE

    December 5, 2019 at 1:05 am

    Hmmmmm…the Mayors office claims it is down.

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Houston News

Texas Back in Business opens applications process 

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Texas Back in Business has launched the application for the federally funded Texas Back in Business program awarding $50,000 up to $250,000 in disaster relief for qualified Texas small businesses damaged by Hurricane Harvey.

The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Community Development Block Grant for Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR). Texas small business owners can apply for the program at no cost at TexasBackInBusiness.com.

“The Texas Back in Business program … will be helping small businesses recover from the cataclysmic blow dealt by Hurricane Harvey,” said Dan Slane, CEO of Texas Back in Business.

Texas Back in Business funds may create or retain jobs, and can be used for operating capital, repairs, inventory, machinery, equipment, supplies and other expenses directly related to the business.


To meet the minimum eligibility requirements, a small business must:
• Have been in business on Aug. 25, 2017;
• Be defined as a small business by the Small Business Administration; 
• Have experienced damage from Hurricane Harvey; and
• Be located in one of the 49 Hurricane Harvey impacted counties deemed eligible by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for disaster recovery funds.



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LIVE COVERAGE: House Judiciary Committee takes up impeachment with hearing

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LIVE COVERAGE: The Judiciary Committee, responsible for drafting articles of impeachment, will hear from four legal experts.

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Texas City female officer indicted in case of ‘excessive force’ on woman in custody

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A female Texas City police officer has been indicted by a Galveston County grand jury of official oppression after investigators said the cop may have violated an excessive force policy while transporting a woman to jail, according to the Texas City chief of police.

Shelby Wright, a four-year veteran of the Texas City Police Department, was indicted on Monday and given a $2,500 bond after investigators said a woman, who was in handcuffs, “received an injury to her nose” while being transported to the holding area of Texas City Jail in April by Wright in her police unit. The woman was then taken to a hospital to be treated, officials said.

READ ALSO: Second victim comes forward against Houston-area cop charged with sexual assault

It’s unclear how the injury occurred, and police declined further comment.  But a grand jury in a Dec. 3 indictment said Wright pushed the woman “causing bodily injury” to her.


A statement by Texas City Police Chief Joe Stanton said the woman’s injury was reported to the duty captain, who then reviewed the jail video and the body camera video of the arrest. The police captain then notified Stanton, who initiated an internal affairs investigation in April following the incident.

Wright was reassigned to administrative duties pending the outcome of the investigation. On April 8, the videos and the reports were taken to the Galveston County District Attorney’s Office, where it was then presented to a grand jury, Stanton said in his statement.

According to the statement, the Texas City Police Department has “strict policies prohibiting its police officers from using excessive force against anyone with whom they come into contact.”

“Every incident of this kind in which force is used is taken seriously and subject to review by the department,” Stanton said. “Our officers are subject to discipline up to and including possible termination for violating such policies.”

Official oppression occurs when a public servant abuses their official capacity, according to Texas law. It is punishable by up to one year in jail and a $4,000 fine.

Michelle Iracheta is a digital reporter in Houston. Read her on our breaking news site, Chron.com, and on our subscriber site, houstonchronicle.com. | michelle.iracheta@chron.com



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