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सोलर अपनाओ समझदार कहलाओ (रिंकी और बंटी) – A story on Solar Power

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“रिंकी और बंटी” 10 एनीमेशन फिल्मों की एक ऐसी श्रृंखला है जो पर्यावरण की रक्षा करने में बच्चों की सकारात्मक भूमिका को उजागर करती है। इन कहानियों में रिंकी और बंटी की सोच और जीने के दो विरोधी तरीके लाते हैं, जिनसे हम सीखते हैं कि पानी, ऊर्जा या जैव विविधता के सरल उपाय हमें और अधिक जिम्मेदार नागरिक कैसे बना सकते हैं। यह श्रृंखला बच्चों को वर्तमान पर्यावरण चुनौतियों और उन्हें संबोधित करने के लिए आवश्यक समाधानों की वैज्ञानिक समझ विकसित करने में मदद करती है। इसका निर्माण टेरी संस्था द्वारा विज्ञान और प्रौद्योगिकी विभाग के सहयोग से किया गया है।
ऐसे और वीडियो देखने के लिए हमारे YouTube चैनल को सब्सक्राइब करें: https://www.youtube.com/teri

“Rinky aur Bunty” is a series of 10 animation films that highlight the positive role children can play in conserving the environment. As Rinky and Bunty bring two opposing ways of thinking and living, we learn how simple measures of saving water, energy or biodiversity can make us more responsible citizens. This series helps children to develop a scientific understanding of current environmental challenges and the solutions needed to address them. It has been produced by TERI with support from Department of Science and Technology.
Subscribe our YouTube Channel for more such videos: https://www.youtube.com/teri
#SolarPower #RinkyAurBunty #EnvironmentEducation

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Business

Michigan ports closed for business? Two case studies

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The second example of how Detroit CBP policies affect Michigan ports involved a huge construction project in Grayling.

In 2015, Ft. Mill, S.C.-based Arauco North America Inc. reached a deal with the state to build the largest particleboard mill in North America, a $400 million project supported by property-tax incentives of $11.8 million. The Department of Natural Resources sold Arauco 600 acres for the plant at $1,400 an acre.

Arauco broke ground on the project in April 2017, and the plan was to have 14 ships from Europe loaded with construction material travel through the St. Lawrence Seaway to the Port of Monroe, then have the cargo loaded onto trucks to be transported up I-75.

Houston-based Spliethoff USA used the CBP’s web-based tool, Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) in mid-May, to get approval for the cargo, and a ship left Antwerp in early June. The plan was to unload steel containers in Cleveland and then proceed to the Port of Monroe, where crated cargo would be unloaded for the project and trucked to Grayling.

The expected arrival in Monroe was June 24, but as the ship was crossing Lake Ontario on June 18, the Detroit office of CBP sent a letter to Spliethoff, notifying it that the cargo could not be unloaded in Monroe after all. When Spliethoff asked for an explanation, it was told that the Detroit office was now considering any crated cargo as containerized. Previously, cargo in wooden crates had less stringent examination rules than those for steel shipping containers.

The Detroit office, according to the UM report, said that “a container is not limited to traditional shipping containers, but rather is any cargo enclosed in wood, steel or otherwise.”

The UM report called that a “new definition” of the previous rule.

That ship’s cargo and future shipments were offloaded in Cleveland and Toronto, causing Arauco to incur increased trucking costs.

“The cargo from these ships was allowed to enter at Cleveland because the Port of Cleveland is not in the CBP Detroit Field Office jurisdiction, but rather that of CBP’s Chicago Office,” according to the UM report. “The cargo was not opened, devanned, or scanned by CBP in Cleveland before being cleared and released by CBP. Offloading fees, wages and taxes were lost to port workers, the city of Monroe and the state of Michigan.”

The UM report said that the changes required by the Detroit office of CBP cost various partners in the project between $1.9 million and $3.1 million in added costs. In addition, the Port of Monroe and its dock operator lost out on about $15.4 million in revenue that was shifted to Ohio and Toronto.

Spliethoff told the UM students it had to cancel plans for two to four other sailings per month, with between 100 and 150 containers each, for the 2018 shipping season, and a contract between General Motors and Spliethoff to use the Port of Monroe was cancelled.

Spliethoff estimated it lost out on $12.5 million in revenue in the 2018 shipping season solely based on the inability to use the port.

A spokesperson for the BNSF Railway Co., the largest freight railroad network in North America, told UM researchers that, in the report’s words, “that he had never seen anything like this throughout his 35-year logistics career. Given the issues the company and their client Arauco experienced when trying to use the Port of Monroe, he said that he urges industry associates he encounters at trade shows and his clients, many of which are multinational corporations like Arauco, not to use the Port of Monroe, warning of potential costs brought on by their customs issues. The Arauco-CBP debacle, he said, sends the signal that Michigan is not open for business.”

The Detroit office of CBP declined three requests for an interview.

LaMarre said further studies are in the works.

“”We are in the midst of doing a second study with the same team which will be a comparative analysis of the State of Michigan’s investment in commercial port infrastructure projects as compared to the other Great Lakes states and coastal ports,” he told Crain’s.



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Port of Monroe’s economic impact grows in recent years

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The Port of Monroe, categorized as a deep-draft commercial harbor, opened on the River Raisin where it flows into Lake Erie in 1932. Historically, the port has primarily focused on bulk commodities cargo, including huge amounts of coal to the giant Detroit Edison power plant that is its neighbor, as well as petroleum products, limestone, synthetic gypsum and liquid asphalt.

Currently, the Paul R. Tregurtha, the largest ship on the Great Lakes at 1,013 feet in length, makes weekly delivery of coal to DTE, with a capacity of almost 65,000 tons.

Limestone cement dust is also delivered to the port, where it is used to scrub DTE’s smokestacks. That scrubbing in turn creates a byproduct called synthetic gypsum, which is then shipped to Alpena.

According to a report released in September 2018 by the consulting firm of Martin Associates of Lancaster, Pa., there were 751 jobs directly associated in 2017 with the port of Monroe, generating wages and salaries of $37.6 million. “Direct” means jobs directly generated from maritime cargo movement, including port operating jobs and jobs associated with movement of the cargo via additional transportation modes such as trucking and rail.

In addition, there were 334 indirect jobs associated with the port, generating $15.7 million in wages and salaries. “Indirect” refers to jobs supporting the port, including jobs at office supply firms, maintenance and repair firms and parts and equipment suppliers.

Finally, there were about 574 induced jobs associated with the port generating $67.8 million. “Induced” means jobs associated with economic activity that is generated with direct job holders who spend money on goods and services in the region, including housing, clothing and food.

In total, in 2017, the port was associated with 1,659 jobs that generated $121.1 million in wages, salaries and consumption expenditures. Those figures are a substantial increase from 2011 figures, when it was estimated the port created 577 direct, indirect and induced jobs and $44.1 million in wages, salaries and consumption expenditures.

Most of that growth has been under Paul LaMarre, a former Navy fighter pilot who became director of the port in 2012.

“The Port of Monroe has expanded exponentially under Paul LaMarre. I’d hate to see that growth stopped because of the Detroit office of Customs and Border Protection,” said U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg.



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TOP 10 Countries by GDP per capita, PPP (current international $)

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Ecomony Visualized video shows TOP 10 Countries by GDP per capita, Purchasing power parity (PPP) current international $ History since 1980 to 2024.

GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States.

What Is Purchasing Power Parity (PPP)?

One popular macroeconomic analysis metric to compare economic productivity and standards of living between countries is purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP is an economic theory that compares different countries’ currencies through a “basket of goods” approach.

World Bank, International Comparison Program database. data.worldbank.org.

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