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Выступление Владимира Жильцова перед соискателями SACM DBA CEO/CDO

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Презентация программы Doctor of Business Administration «Управление цифровыми технологиями и Цифровой Трансформацией»
Диплом / Сертификат – DBA Chief Digital & Executive Officer
Исследовательская / Дистанционная форма обучения
Срок обучения на программе 5 семестров / 15 месяцев
Программа является уникальным образовательным продуктом и предлагается для руководителей и директоров, отвечающих за управление цифровыми технологиями и цифровой трансформацией в коммерческих компаниях и организациях государственного управления. Программа сочетает две ключевых квалификации – Chief Executive Officer и Chief Digital Officer, получение которых гарантирует докторанту возможность занимать высокие руководящие позиции в организациях цифровой экономики, совмещая при этом самые современные и эффективные технологические и управленческие компетенции.

Владимир Жильцов
DBA, Кандидат наук. Военное, инженерное, психологическое образование. Имеет многолетний опыт руководителя и ответственного исполнителя комплексных НИОКР Министерства Обороны РФ. Бизнес-тренер, консультант, ментор, автор публикаций по вопросам профессионального развития, психологии управления, профессионализма руководителей, профессионального отбора, эргономики и диагностики.
В 2001-2013 годы доцент кафедры менеджмента МГГУ им. Шолохова, с 2004 года доцент и член-корреспондент Международной академии психологических наук, с 2005 года заведующий кафедрой общей психологии в ИГУМО.

Пригашенный профессор РАНХ и ГС, РЭА им. Плеханова и ряда других вузов России.
С 2010 года тьютор программы «Chief Executive Officer» Британской академии бизнеса (British Business Academy Research & Teaching International).
Директор АНО «Национальный центр сертификации управляющих», Лидер проекта Агентства Стратегических Инициатив «Создание сети национальных агентств развития квалификаций и компетенций», Секретарь Координационного Совета системы добровольной сертификации управляющих «Стандарты первых», Исполнительный секретарь Совета директоров Агентства развития профессиональных квалификаций.
Член Общественного Совета НП «Внешторгклуб», Член международной академии профессионального образования IVETA, Действительный член Британской академии бизнеса (за вклад в исследовательские проекты).
Успешно руководил военными, научными, внедренческими организациями, применяя и отрабатывая методы развития профессионализма.
Имеет патенты на полезные модели и компьютерные программы.
Тьютор кафедры Управления организацией Сингапурской Академии Корпоративного Менеджмента.

www.singapore-academy.org
SACM TV (c) 2020

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Iran confirms two deaths, IMF chief issues warning

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This is a live blog. Please check back for updates.

All times below are in Eastern time.

  • Total confirmed cases: More than 75,200
  • Total deaths: At least 2,007

2:19 pm: Tyson Foods sees business slow in China due to outbreak

Tyson Foods’ CEO said at a conference that the company has seen Chinese ports backed up as a result of the virus, slowing down the import of its U.S. meat products. Shares of the world’s second-largest meat processor fell 1% in afternoon trading on the comments. “There’s a definite need within the country to fulfill customer demand, to feed the people and we are continuing to ship product,” Tyson CEO Noel White said. In the next few years, Tyson expects to see higher demand as a result of African swine fever, which has hit China’s pork supply and global pork prices. Beijing lifted a years-long ban on importing U.S. poultry meat in November.

1:53 pm: The market continues to take outbreak in stride

1:12 pm: Diamond Princess cruise passengers disembark quarantined ship in Japan

Hundreds of passengers trundled off a cruise ship in Japan after being held on board in quarantine for more than two weeks, as criticism mounted of Japan’s handling of the biggest coronavirus outbreak outside China. More than 620 passengers and crew became infected with the virus over the course of the quarantine, raising questions about whether it helped or hurt efforts to contain the outbreak. The Diamond Princess has been quarantined at a dock at Yokohama near Tokyo since Feb. 3, initially with 3,700 people aboard. Passengers who test negative and show no symptoms are free to leave. Around 500 were expected to disembark on Wednesday, with the rest of those eligible leaving over the next two days. Confirmed cases were to be sent to hospital, while those who shared cabins with infected passengers may still be kept on board. The United States flew more than 300 passengers to air bases in California and Texas this week. — Reuters

A bus leaves the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship at a port Sunday, Feb. 16, 2020, in Yokohama, near Tokyo. The U.S. says Americans aboard a quarantined ship will be flown back home on a chartered flight Sunday, but that they will face another two-week quarantine.

Jae C. Hong | AP Photo

12:49 pm: Fed’s Kashkari warns US could feel economic impact from persistent outbreak

Minneapolis Federal Reserve President Neel Kashkari warned the U.S. would likely feel economic effects if the coronavirus continues to plague Asian commerce. Speaking at a symposium in Mankato, Minnesota, Kashkari explained the impact to Asia could bleed into the U.S. if the outbreak persists. “China’s economy is a big engine of the world economy. So that will affect all of us,” he said. “It’s unlikely that if this continues that we’re going to be completely immune from the economic effects of a slowdown in Asia.” — Franck

People wearing face masks move packs of vegetables at a wholesale market for agricultural products, as the country is hit by an outbreak of the novel coronavirus, in Beijing, China February 19, 2020.

Tingshu Wang | Reuters

12:08 pm: China reportedly plans to take over HNA Group and sell its airline assets

China plans to take over HNA Group and sell off its airline assets, as the coronavirus outbreak hits the Chinese conglomerate’s ability to meet financial obligations, Bloomberg reported, citing people familiar with the matter. The government of Hainan, the southern province where HNA is based, is in talks to take control of the conglomerate, the report said. HNA did not immediately respond to an e-mailed request for comment on the Bloomberg report. — Higgins-Dunn

11:05 am: Iran reports two deaths

Two Iranians have died in the

hospital after testing positive for the new coronavirus in the holy Shi’ite city of Qom, the head of the city’s University of Medical Sciences told Mehr news agency on Wednesday. “Two Iranians, who tested positive earlier today for new coronavirus, died of respiratory illness,” the official told Mehr. Iran’s health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur confirmed their death on Twitter. Iran confirmed earlier in the day its first two cases of the virus, government spokesman Ali Rabiei said, shortly after reports that preliminary tests on the two had come back positive.The health ministry said earlier that the patients had been put in isolation. — Reuters

10:04 am: IMF chief calls outbreak the ‘most pressing uncertainty’ for global economy

International Monetary Fund head Kristalina Georgieva said the COVID-19 outbreak is the “most pressing uncertainty” for the global economy. The new coronavirus has already slowed China’s economic growth for the year — just how much depends on how well world leaders can contain the fast-spreading outbreak, she said in a blog post. “There are a number of scenarios, depending on how quickly the spread of the virus is contained,” she said. If it’s contained quickly, she said, China’s overall 2020 GDP growth will be hurt, but just slightly and cross-border spillover would remain minimal. “However, a long-lasting and more severe outbreak would result in a sharper and more protracted growth slowdown in China. Its global impact would be amplified through more substantial supply chain disruptions and a more persistent drop in investor confidence, especially if the epidemic spreads beyond China.” — Feuer

9:15 am: Plugable Technologies warns the worst of its supply disruption won’t hit for months

The CEO and founder of Plugable Technologies, which sells USB, Bluetooth and power devices and partners with 15 factories in China, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” he is expecting the virus to disrupt his supply chain during March and April the most because securing any extra inventory will take at least two months to move through the supply chain. CEO Bernie Thompson said he has also had trouble with factories outside China since it only takes one part built in the country to disrupt the entire supply chain, especially in the electronics industry. —Higgins-Dunn

9:01 am: Virus hits small business owners who import products from China

As coronavirus spreads around the world, small business owners who import from China are on edge. CNBC spoke with Kyle Kirshner, who has been doing business in China for several years. He knew to stock up on supplies ahead of the Lunar New Year, but prolonged factory shutdowns threatened his business and that of others who import products from China. Kirshner owns Kyndley, which sells outdoor products via Amazon and imports 90% of its goods from China. He expects his supply will be impacted within a month if things don’t turn around. And if he doesn’t have product to list on Amazon, his rankings may drop and hurt sales. — Rogers

8 am: China expels three WSJ journalists

China has revoked the press credentials of three journalists from The Wall Street Journal after the newspaper declined to apologize for a column that called China the “real sick man of Asia,” China’s foreign ministry said. Spokesman Geng Shuang told a daily briefing that Beijing made several representations to the paper over the column, which China criticized as racist and denigrating its efforts to combat the coronavirus epidemic, but that the paper had failed to apologize or investigate those responsible. Deputy Bureau Chief Josh Chin and reporter Chao Deng, both U.S. nationals, as well as reporter Philip Wen, an Australian national, have been ordered to leave the country within five days, the WSJ reported. — Feuer

7:30 am: Adidas reports 85% drop in China business activity

German sportswear maker Adidas said business in China dropped by about 85% year on year as the coronavirus outbreak has resulted in store closures and fewer customers visiting the remaining outlets. Adidas said it had seen lower traffic, mainly in Japan and South Korea, but added that it had not yet registered any major business impact beyond Greater China. “As the situation keeps evolving on a daily basis, the magnitude of the overall impact on our business for the full-year 2020 cannot be quantified reliably at this point in time,” it said. — Reuters

A masked man guards at the entrance to a village as a measure to contain the COVID-19 spread in Zhangye in northwest China’s Gansu province Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020.

Barcroft Media | Getty Images

6:30 am: Iran says two people have tested positive for coronavirus

Iranian authorities reported two suspected cases of the coronavirus, according to the country’s semi-official ISNA news agency. A health ministry spokHesperson said both cases were in the city of Qom and the patients had been put into isolation. “The next stages of testing are underway and the final results of these tests will be released to the public once they have been determined,” Kiyanoush Jahanpour, a spokesperson at Iran’s health ministry, said in a statement, ISNA reported. Iran has not previously confirmed any cases of the coronavirus. — Meredith

5:40 am: Japan says 79 more people have tested positive for coronavirus on Diamond Princess cruise ship

Japan confirmed 79 new cases aboard the Diamond Princess cruise liner, taking the total number of on-board infections to 621. Japan’s public broadcaster, NHK, citing the health ministry, said 68 of the 79 people with COVID-19 didn’t have any symptoms. Earlier, passengers and crew members on board the quarantined cruise ship, who were not taking government repatriation flights, started the process of disembarking. There may be more positive test results as people need certificates indicating they tested negative for the virus before they can leave. — Meredith

Read CNBC’s coverage from CNBC’s Asia-Pacific and Europe teams overnight here: Iran says two test positive for virus, death toll tops 2,000.

— Reuters and CNBC’s Thomas Franck, Noah Higgins-Dunn, Kate Rogers, Sam Meredith contributed to this report.



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These high-income taxpayers are getting a visit from the IRS

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The IRS will soon start make house calls to high-income individuals who didn’t submit a tax return.

Starting this month, the agency will send its revenue officers to visit people with income in excess of $100,000 and who failed to file Form 1040 in 2018 or in previous years.

“These visits shouldn’t come as a surprise to the taxpayer because the IRS has contacted these individuals multiple times regarding their tax issues prior to their cases being assigned to an IRS revenue officer,” said Hank Kea, director of field collection operations, small business/self-employed division, at the federal agency.

Kea discussed the new measures on a phone call with reporters on Wednesday.

So far, the IRS anticipates making about 800 in-person visits to these high-income non-filers in the first two months, he said. Thousands more will follow through the year. The agency anticipates sending additional revenue officers out as it identifies more cases of noncompliance.

“When you look at the tax gap, there’s a significant amount of revenue lost to individual high-income non-filers, and it literally does measure into the billions,” Kea said.

The visits are taking place at a time when taxpayers enjoy reduced odds of an audit by the IRS. During the fiscal year 2019, only 0.45% of taxpayers were audited.

Third-party data

The IRS can sniff out unreported income and earnings through third-party reporting sources, including your employer, your bank or brokerage, and small businesses that pay you.

When those entities detail your wages on your Form W-2 or report payment on a Form 1099, a corresponding report goes out to the taxman.

The IRS flags returns in which taxpayers’ returns fail to match those third-party reports.

By the time a revenue officer has been dispatched to your home or office, the IRS has already been in touch with you via snail mail several times to address your obligations.

“When clients of mine get a visit from the IRS, they get a little note posted to the door, saying to call this person at the IRS,” said Laurie Kazenoff, partner at law firm Moritt Hock & Hamroff LLP.

“In my mind, the visit serves two purposes,” she said. “It jolts the taxpayer into compliance and the second reason is to gain information about the taxpayer — see where the taxpayer lives and the vehicles they drive.

Bear in mind that the IRS doesn’t initiate contact with taxpayers through unsolicited calls or e-mails. Be wary if someone claiming to be from the IRS calls you out of the blue and demands payment; it’s probably a scammer.

File and pay on time

The Internal Revenue Services offices in Washington, D.C.

Adam Jeffery | CNBC

If you’re dreading filing your tax return because you have a large sum due, always take the first step of at least submitting your Form 1040.

The IRS tacks on steep penalties for those who fail to file.

In that case, you’re responsible for 5% of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month that the return is late.

While you can file for a six-month extension to submit your 2019 tax return, you have until April 15 to pay whatever sums you owe.

More from Smart Tax Planning:
What Trump’s tax overhaul extension plans mean for you
One in 5 fear they’ll owe the IRS money this spring
How to protect yourself from tax scams this season

The failure-to-pay penalty is equal to 0.5% of the taxes owed after the due date for each month or part of a month the liability goes unpaid.

In a dire situation, you could file your return on time and work out a payment plan with the IRS.

Options include a 120-day installment plan with no set-up fees; however, penalties and interest will accrue until you’re fully paid.



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China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

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China revoked the press credentials of three Wall Street Journal reporters based in Beijing, the first time in the post-Mao era that the Chinese government has expelled multiple journalists from one international news organization at the same time.

China’s Foreign Ministry said the move Wednesday was punishment for a recent opinion piece published by the Journal.

Deputy Bureau Chief Josh Chin and reporter Chao Deng, both U.S. nationals, as well as reporter Philip Wen, an Australian national, have been ordered to leave the country within five days, said Jonathan Cheng, the Journal’s China bureau chief.

The expulsions by China’s Foreign Ministry followed widespread public anger at the headline on the Feb. 3 opinion piece, which referred to China as “the real sick man of Asia.” The ministry and state-media outlets had repeatedly called attention to the headline in statements and posts on social media and had threatened unspecified consequences.

“Regrettably, what the WSJ has done so far is nothing but parrying and dodging its responsibility,” Foreign Ministry spokesman

Geng Shuang

said in a daily news briefing Wednesday. “The Chinese people do not welcome those media that speak racially discriminatory language and maliciously slander and attack China.”

The three journalists work for the Journal’s news operation. The Journal operates with a strict separation between news and opinion.

Wall Street Journal Publisher and Dow Jones CEO William Lewis said he was disappointed by the decision to expel the journalists and asked the Foreign Ministry to reconsider.

“This opinion piece was published independently from the WSJ newsroom and none of the journalists being expelled had any involvement with it,” Mr. Lewis said.

“Our opinion pages regularly publish articles with opinions that people disagree—or agree—with and it was not our intention to cause offense with the headline on the piece,” Mr. Lewis said. “However, this has clearly caused upset and concern amongst the Chinese people, which we regret.”

Dow Jones is owned by

News Corp.

Secretary of State

Mike Pompeo

criticized China’s action, saying: “The United States condemns China’s expulsion of three Wall Street Journal foreign correspondents. Mature, responsible countries understand that a free press reports facts and expresses opinions. The correct response is to present counter arguments, not restrict speech. The United States hopes that the Chinese people will enjoy the same access to accurate information and freedom of speech that Americans enjoy.”

China is battling a fast-spreading coronavirus, as well as questions from Chinese citizens and some global health experts about Beijing’s handling of the epidemic, which has included the lockdown of much of Hubei province, with a population of nearly 60 million. Public anger at a perceived lack of transparency surrounding the coronavirus has exploded online, overwhelming the country’s censorship apparatus.

In August, the Chinese government didn’t renew press credentials for Chun Han Wong, a Beijing-based correspondent who co-wrote a news article on a cousin of Chinese President

Xi Jinping

whose activities were being scrutinized by Australian law-enforcement and intelligence agencies.

Mr. Xi’s private life and those of his relatives are considered sensitive by Chinese authorities. The Foreign Ministry had cautioned the Journal at the time against publishing the article, warning of unspecified consequences.

Mr. Wong was the first China-based Journal reporter to have his credentials denied since the newspaper opened a bureau in Beijing in 1980.

Beijing has taken a more combative stance with the foreign media in recent years, as Mr. Xi’s government has exerted greater control over information and reasserted the Communist Party’s influence over citizens’ lives.

It has declined to renew the credentials of several reporters, but it is rare for it to expel a credentialed foreign correspondent.

China hasn’t expelled a credentialed foreign correspondent since 1998.

Chinese authorities expelled two American reporters simultaneously in the aftermath of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, though they worked for different news organizations.

John Pomfret

was a correspondent for the Associated Press while

Alan Pessin

was Beijing bureau chief for Voice of America.

The simultaneous expulsions of Wall Street Journal reporters Wednesday marks “an unprecedented form of retaliation against foreign journalists in China,” the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China said. “The action taken against The Journal correspondents is an extreme and obvious attempt by the Chinese authorities to intimidate foreign news organizations by taking retribution against their China-based correspondents.”

Censorship has been more strictly imposed on domestic news outlets and social media, and authorities have strengthened internet firewalls designed to keep Chinese people from accessing foreign reporting that Beijing deems objectionable.

On Tuesday, the U.S. State Department said it had decided to identify the U.S. operations of state-run Chinese news outlets as foreign missions akin to embassies or consulates, the latest in a series of moves designed to pressure China’s Communist Party into loosening controls on diplomats and foreign media. Employees of those news organizations will now be required to register with the State Department as consular staff, though their reporting activities won’t be curtailed, U.S. officials said.

Mr. Geng, the Foreign Ministry spokesman, called that change “totally unjustified and unacceptable” and warned of unspecified repercussions.

The phrase “sick man of Asia” was used by both outsiders and Chinese intellectuals to refer to a weakened China’s exploitation by European powers and Japan in the late 1800s and early 1900s, a period now described in Chinese history textbooks as the “century of humiliation.”

The Journal’s use of the phrase in a headline, on an opinion column by Hudson Institute scholar

Walter Russell Mead

that referred to the coronavirus epidemic in China, sparked waves of angry commentary on Chinese social media.

The three Journal reporters are based in Beijing.

Mr. Chin, 43 years old, has worked for the Journal in various roles since 2008 and in recent years covered cybersecurity, law and human rights. A team he led won a 2018 Gerald Loeb Award for its coverage of the Communist Party’s pioneering embrace of digital surveillance.

Ms. Deng, 32 years old, joined the Journal in 2012 and has reported out of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Beijing. Her recent areas of focus included China’s economy and finance, and the trade war between the U.S. and China. Ms. Deng is currently reporting in Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the coronavirus epidemic originated late last year.

Mr. Wen, 35 years old, started at the Journal in 2019 and has been reporting on Chinese politics. He co-wrote the article with Mr. Wong on the cousin of Mr. Xi whose activities were being scrutinized by Australian law-enforcement and intelligence agencies.

All three have reported on the Chinese Communist Party’s mass surveillance and detention of Uighur Muslims in the country’s far western Xinjiang region.

Copyright ©2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8



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